Art History and Museum Professions

http://fitnyc.edu/vam

Bachelor of Science Degree Program (BS)

Applications accepted for fall only. HEGIS 1099

The major in Art History and Museum Professions offers students the opportunity to prepare for positions in museums and other art institutions, with a focus on collections management, public relations, development, education, rights and reproductions, visitor services, special events, and other non-curatorial roles.

Semester 5Credits
MAJOR AREAVA 321 - Methods and Meanings in the Visual Arts3
choice - see History of Art Group A **3
LIBERAL ARTSEN 321 - Strategies of Business Communication3
choice - see Foreign Language* G83.5
choice - see Liberal Arts Elective*3
Semester 6
MAJOR AREABL 343 - Introduction to Business Law3
VA 431 - The Business of Art Museum Management3
choice - see History of Art Group B** G93
LIBERAL ARTSMA 311 - Mathematical Modeling for Business Applications3
choice - see Foreign Language*3-3.5
Semester 7
MAJOR AREAAC 322 - Publicity/Public Relations for Visual Art Management3
HA 411 - Western Theories of Art3
choice - see History of Art Group C**3
choice - see History of Art Elective**3
RELATED AREAFA 117 - Traditional Techniques in the Fine Arts2
LIBERAL ARTSLA 221 - U.S. History: Civil War to Present G103
Semester 8
MAJOR AREAAC 311 - Integrated Marketing Communications Management3
VA 491 - Senior Seminar: The Museum Exhibition3
RELATED AREAIC 497 - Senior Internship C: Career Planning3
LIBERAL ARTSchoice - see Speech*3
ELECTIVEchoice - General Elective2-3
TOTAL CREDIT REQUIREMENTS
MAJOR AREA33
RELATED AREA5
LIBERAL ARTS21.5-22
ELECTIVE2-3
 Total Credits: 61.5-63

SUNY General Education Requirements:
A “G” followed by a number 1-10 identifies specific courses that meet SUNY General Education baccalaureate degree requirements (or visit fitnyc.edu/gened).

G1 Basic Communication; G2 Mathematics; G3 Natural Sciences; G4 Social Sciences; G5 Western Civilization; G6 The Arts; G7 Humanities; G8 Foreign Language; G9 Other World Civilizations; G10 American History.

*Requirements: See below.

Foreign Language: 6.5-7 credits
Two semesters of the same foreign language, one of which must be a 3.5 credit nonconversational course (G8).

Liberal Arts Electives: 3 credits
CHOICE in Semester 5 of any non-HA liberal arts course.

Speech: 3 credits
CHOICE in Semester 8 of EN 241, 242, 243, 244, or 245.

**History of Art Electives: 12 credits

Group A (Western Surveys): 3 credits
HA 231 required (if not previously taken), or
CHOICE of HA 311, 314, 331, or 332.

Group B (Non-Western Civilizations): 3 credits
CHOICE of HA 121, 216, 221, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 315, 395, or 397 (any one of these meets G9).

Group C (Specialized Media): 3 credits
CHOICE of HA 214, 217, 315, 333, 342, 343, 344, 345, 347, 348, or 381.

History of Art Elective: 3 credits
CHOICE in Semester 7 of any HA course not previously taken.

NOTE: AC 111 and HA 112 must be completed prior to the sixth semester.

Courses

VA 321 — Methods and Meanings in the Visual Arts

3 CREDITS; 3 LECTURE HOURS

For students majoring in Art History and Museum Professions, this course provides a foundation in visual analysis and a historical overview of museums, exhibitions, and art history. Writing skills relevant to art commentary and gallery management are emphasized

VA 431 — The Business of Art Museum Management

3 CREDITS; 3 LECTURE HOURS

Students build a firm knowledge of the business of managing an art museum; namely, how to achieve the institution's mission for the benefit of its diverse constituents. Students complete a group project covering the broad array of support activities that must be considered for the presentation of an exhibition

VA 491 — Senior Seminar: The Museum Exhibition

3 CREDITS; 3 LECTURE HOURS

Using a major current exhibition as a case study, students examine the entire process of creating an exhibition. Through readings, field trips, and presentations by art professionals, students track the trajectory of an exhibition, from its original concept to its final, realized form, and gauge the subsequent critical response