HI 050 — HISTORY TRANSFER CREDIT

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

HI 060 — HISTORY TRANSFER CREDIT

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

HI 201 — Classics in African American History

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Slavery and emancipation, Jim Crow, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, the Civil Rights Movement—stories of Africa’s descendants in the United States have inspired legendary works of history. Students will consider the narrative, research, and literary strategies of some great books from the past two centuries. (G5: Western Civilization; G7: Humanities).

HI 202 — U.S. History: Civil War- Present

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An introduction to American history, this course moves from a brief view of American geography, economics, and government to a more focused examination of the social, political, and economic experience from the Civil War through the Cold War and to the present. Students are introduced to basic historical methodology and learn to apply these techniques through critical readin, analtyical writing, and verbal presentations. (Formerly LA 221) (G10: American History).

HI 203 — Distant Neighbors: A History of Latin America and the U.S.

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course compares the histories of Latin America and the United States from pre-Columbian times to the 20th century. Students learn about the deep influence of the United States in Latin American economies, politics, and culture, especially after the United States' independence, when American democracy became a political model for the former Spanish American colonies. (Formerly LA 224) (G10: American History).

HI 204 — Leisure in America

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines the emergence and changing role of leisure and its relation to work in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Situating leisure within its specific social, economic, and political contexts, students explore the complex intersection of factors and forces that have shaped conceptions and practices of leisure in American life through primary and secondary texts, both written and visual. (Formerly LA 225) (G10: American History)
Prerequisite(s): EN 121 or ES 129.

HI 205 — American Business from Slavery to the Present

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

A defining experience of the last millennium, and possibly the next, is the rise of big business in the U.S. Students learn a general history of entrepreneurship in America and a series of case studies about government regulation, labor relations, and other topics.
Prerequisite(s): None.

HI 206 — Pasts in the Present: Modern Chinese History since 1800

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces students to modern Chinese history as well as ways through which one can examine and understand the historical roots of current affairs in and related to China. Two major themes are: changes and continuity in modern China, and China in the world. (Formerly LA 227)(G9: Other World Civilizations)
Prerequisite(s): None.

HI 207 — Hollywood: A History

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students learn the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present through the lens of the American film industry. The course focuses on the economic structure of the film industry and the evolving depictions of violence in movies as a factor in American History. (Formerly LA 242) (G10: American History).

HI 391 — U.S. History and Culture: 1860 to Present

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Major historic events and developments in the United States history from 1860 to the present are examined in the context of their impact on the country's government, politics, and culture. Works by painters, photographers, sculptors, advertisers, dancers, musicians, novelists, filmmakers, and dramatists are used to broaden the study of U.S. history. (Formerly LA 392) (G10: American History).

HI 392 — (Honors) Religion and Religious Dissent in American History to the Civil War

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students examine the ways in which religious controversies have figured, directly and indirectly, in many of the major events in the early history of the United States, up to and including the Civil War. (Formerly LA 396)(G7: Humanities; G10 American History).

HI 393 — New York City and the Invention of America

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students learn the history of America from the Civil War to the present, through the lens of its greatest metropolis. Readings stress the roles that New York has played as innovator, counterpoint, and despised exception in the culture, economics, politics, and technology of the U.S. Students develop skills in basic primary research, public speaking, reading comprehension, and writing and revising. (Formerly LA 397)(G10: American History).

HI 394 — Rebellion and Resistance in America

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines the social, cultural, and political types of rebellion and resistance from their historical roots in Colonial and Revolutionary America to their modern and contemporary forms in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students analyze the tactics, strategies, and objectives of individual and collective action from across the political spectrum. (Formerly LA 398)(G10: American History).

HI 395 — Big Ideas in History: Smith, Darwin, Marx, Freud

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students learn Western history through the lesn of the Big Four of modern thought-Adam Smith, Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, and Sigmund Freud. They use their ideas to grapple with European and American history from the Age of Empire to teh birth of modern business, politics, and people. (Formerly LA 399)(G5: Western Civilization; G7: Humanities).