MC 200 — Mediterranean Crossings: Migration, Integration, and Social Unrest

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course looks at how migratory experiences through the Mediterranean have been depicted by migrant writers and filmmakers. Students examine selected films and literary texts and analyze them within the context of migratory phenomena. Texts discussed also include short stories, films and documentaries, photography, literary criticism, and popular songs (G5: Western Civilization; G7: Humanities).

MC 201 — Mafia Movies: Crime and Corruption in Italian Popular Culture

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

Examines Italian film and television representations of the Mafia. Students view selected films and analyze them within the context of the historical and social development of organized crime in Italy. Texts discussed also include novels, historical studies, film criticism, photography, documentaries, and popular songs. (G7: Humanities; G6: The Arts).

MC 202 — Rome: The Making and Unmaking of the Eternal City

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Perhaps more than any other city, Rome is caught between two seemingly incompatible realities: the vitality of a modern capital in constant expansion and the inertia of an ancient city that houses countless treasures of artistic, archeological, religious and historical significance. In this course we explore a variety of texts (ancient and modern) and films which have shaped the image of Rome over several millennia. (G7: Humanities; G5: Western Civilization).

MC 203 — Gender as Performance: Representation of Masculinities in Latin American/Latinx Theatre

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course provides an introduction to Latin American and Latinx theatre from the point of view of gender studies and the representation of masculinities. Students gain an understanding of the different trends that led to the development of theatrical manifestations in Latin America while learning about their historical, socio-economical, political, and cultural context from the late 60s up to nowadays. (G6: The Arts; G7: Humanities; G9 Other World Civilizations).

MC 204 — Images of the Mind: Introduction to Chinese Calligraphic Art (Interdisciplinary)

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This is an interdisciplinary course cross-listed with FA 204 introducing students to Chinese calligraphy. Through guided training students gain knowledge of key concepts, methods and techniques of calligraphy and brush pen writing. Students receive a thorough background in the history of the art form and its significance in Chinese culture, literature and language. (G6: The Arts, G9: Other World Civilization).

MC 205 — Mexican Cinema: Between The National and The Global

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course is cross-listed with FI 206. Students analyze films produced in Mexico from the 1930’s to the present; from the nationalistic underpinnings of earlier productions to contemporary transnational ventures intended to for globalized market. This course considers how Mexico’s history and socioeconomic features inform the aesthetics of Mexican cinema. (G7: Humanities).

MC 206 — Arab Literature and Culture: An Introduction

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines the rich and variegated cultural background of the Arab tradition by looking at language varieties, literary traditions, customs, and representative institutions. It provides an interdisciplinary overview of the major aspects of Arab culture through the study of primary literary texts, media and films. Taught in English. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 207 — Devouring the Screen: Food in Film

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course is cross-listed with FI 207. An exploration of world cinema through the theme of gastronomy. Students learn how food is depicted across various cinematic genres and cultural contexts. Analysis focuses on the development of the “food film” and how cinematic and televisual representations of food communicate issues of gender, economics, politics, sexuality, and ethnic identity. (G7: Humanities).

MC 208 — Paris: Imagined and Real

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

In this course, we explore the space that Paris occupies in both the imagination and history. Paris is many things to many people. Students will make their own assessments of the City of Lights, based on readings, screenings, and other representations of Paris. (G5: Western Civilization; G7: Humanities).

MC 209 — Hispanic Cultures In New York

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course focuses on the development of Hispanic culture in New York from the turn of the 20th Century to the present. Students examine the cultural production from the earlier waves of Hispanic immigration to contemporary expressions of Latinx culture through diverse media sources: writing, video, film, audio, and the visual arts. (G7: Humanities; G10: American History).

MC 211 — Inventing Places: Spatial Myths In Brazilian Cinema

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course is cross-listed FI 211. Students analyze films from diverse periods in Brazilian cinema through a series of places that explore geographic and symbolic spaces in the nation’s cultural imaginary. The City, The Backlands, The Amazons, and the topic of Nomadism are studied considering aspects of Brazilian culture related to race, gender and social class. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 241 — Italian American Cultural Studies

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

A critical examination of Italian American cultural expressed in literature and the arts from the late 19th century to the present. Students analyze a wide variety of related texts including novels, short stories, plays, and poetry, as well as film, music, and the visual arts. Taught in English. (G7: Humanities; G10: American History).

MC 251 — Italian Cinema

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course is cross-listed with FI 243. Students survey the defining elements of Italian cinema from inception to contemporary Italian cinematic practices. Screenings include Neorealist masterpieces, cinema d'autore, commedia all'italiana, spaghetti Westerns, and contemporary Italian films. This course is taught in English. (G7: Humanities; G6: Arts).

MC 252 — Latin American Fiction: 1960-Present

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An examination of selected Latin American fiction (in English translation) from the 1960s to the present. Focuses on literary themes, author's writing techniques, and situates the texts' sociopolitical and historical context of Latin America. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations)
Prerequisite(s): EN 121.

MC 261 — Latin American Cinema and Resistance

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

Course is cross-listed with FI 225. An introduction to Latin American cinema; it considers the pivotal role of diverse forms of resistance, focuses on issues crucial to understanding the continent's cinematic creation, including cultural identity, race, ethnicity and gender. Students develop a critical understanding of the evolution of Latin American film practices since the 1960s to current trends. This course is taught in English. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 262 — Revolution as Spectacle: Mexico

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An exploration of the cultural context of Mexican Revolution, between 1910 and 1940. Cultural production is examined using interconnected perspectives from critical sources and written and visual archival material. Study of the impact of Mexican literary and artistic revolutionary movements in Latin America and the United States during this period.This course is taught in English. (G7: Humanities; G9 Other World Civilizations).

MC 263 — Contemporary Spain through its Cinema

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

Students analyze film and examine different narratives of cultural identity in contemporary Spain, particularly from the period of political transition from dictatorship to democracy: 1975 to the present. This course is taught in English. (G7: Humanities).

MC 300 — The Poetics of Sound in Hispanic Caribbean Literature

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course is designed to explore the interconnectedness of literature with the music of the Hispanic Caribbean (Dominican Republic, Cuba, and Puerto Rico). While our main focus will be the study of seminal literary texts, we will also look at selections from films/ animations and other forms of visual arts to gain additional opportunities to appreciate an artistic, cultural, social, and political profile of the Hispanic Caribbean. This course will be taught in English.

MC 301 — Imaginary Encounters: Representations of the Caribbean (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

In this course, students examine diverse representations of the Caribbean region, from the time of Columbus’ arrival to the present, in scientific, legal and literary texts, as well as through the lens of cartography, the visual arts and film. Class discussion will address issues pertinent to colonialism, imperialism, race, gender, ethnicity and cultural identity (G7: Humanities; G9 Other World Civilizations).

MC 302 — Faire La Cuisine: French Food and Identity

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines the construction of France’s culinary identity, the power of its influence, and how its reputation continues to be maintained. Students explore a variety of texts including recipes, cookbooks, etiquette guides, menus, articles, and restaurant reviews, as well as works of fiction, autobiographies, and films. Conducted in English. (G5: Western Civilization and G7: Humanities).

MC 303 — Black in Paris: African American, African, and Caribbean Writers in the City of Lights (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course will explore the long-historical relationship that African American, African, and Caribbean writers have had with the city of Paris from the colonial period to the postcolonial eras. Central to our discussions will be two of the most prominent 20th Century Black cultural Movements: the Harlem Renaissance and the African and West Indian Negritude Movement. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).
Prerequisite(s): Qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of Dean of Liberal Arts.

MC 304 — Intro to Caribbean Studies

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Cross-listed with SS 304. Introduction to modern Caribbean States and societies with emphasis on their economies, politics and cultures. Students explore current global trends and their impact on the Caribbean region and its diaspora. (G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 305 — Tang Poetry and Calligraphy: Classical Traditions of China (618-907 CE)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces students to Chinese calligraphy and poetry during the Tang period (618-907 CE), the golden age of Chinese art and culture. Students develop extensive knowledge of the classical tradition of Chinese language and literature, an understanding and appreciation of Chinese thought and culture and their place in the broader East Asian cultural ecology since the Middle Ages. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 306 — Narratives of Global Capital: Francophone Africa from the 1960's to the Present

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course focuses on cultural contributions to the wealth of an Africa rising in the Francophone region. Students will be able to identify a shift from the center-periphery model of postcolonial theory to Ngūgī wa Thiong’o’s notion of “globalectics.” Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which film, literature, music, fashion, pop culture, and the visual arts produce knowledge about the cultures of Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Senegal, and their diasporas. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 308 — White Gold: Sugar, Power and the Creation of Atlantic Capitalism (Interdisciplinary)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This is an interdisciplinary course cross-listed with SS 308. In this team-taught course, students study the political and economic implications of the rise of sugar to dietary prominence and the literary representations of this phenomenon. Students examine the human costs of consumer behavior. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 313 — Writing Women of the Italian Renaissance

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An examination of lives and literary endeavors of a select group of Italian, Renaissance era, women writers. Topics include how female writers were written about within the context in which they wrote, the purpose and motivation for writing, type of texts written, audience served, and the effect of social class and religion on work. This course is conducted in English. (G7: Humanities).

MC 331 — Film Genres: Melodrama

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course is cross-listed with FI 335. Students are introduced to the genre of melodrama and its development from the silent era through the present day. Students analyze formal and thematic elements, with a focus on political and social-cultural contexts: Screenings include classical Hollywood pictures, soap operas, telenovelas, and films from Asia, Europe, and Latin America. (G7: Humanities).

MC 345 — Food for Thought: Gastronomy in Italian Literature and Culture

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An overview of italian literature reveals how, through food, Italians have affirmed and defended their cultural heritage. Utilizing an analysis of influential literary texts, students examine the historical evolution of Italian cuisine from the excesses of the Roman table to today’s ‘slow food movement’ and Taught in English. (G5: Western Civilizaiotn; G7: Humanities)
Prerequisite(s): EN 121 or equivalent.

MC 351 — From Modern to Contemporary Latin American Women Writers

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An introduction to Latin American literature written by women. Using the lense of sociopolitical realities on the Latin American continent, students critically examine work created in diverse genres. Course is taught in English. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

MC 499 — Independent Study Modern Language and Culture

1-3 credit; 1 lecture hour