SS 100 — Economics for Fashion Creators

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces fashion creators to practical applications of economic concepts needed to run a fashion branding business. Students learn the economic decision-making process for a small start-up that eventually will grow into a large fashion enterprise. In a final project, students formulate a business plan. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 101 — Mathematical Economics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course helps students in creative fields develop quantitative skills in economics that are important for academic success, preparation for careers or graduate school, and entrepreneurial endeavors. The course empowers students to master quantitative skills in a supportive environment with applications to the fashion industry and other creative fields. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 131 — General Psychology

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Principles of psychology and their application to general behavior are presented. Stresses the scientific method in understanding learning, perception, motivation, emotion, personality development, and the social influences on human behavior. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 141 — Macroeconomics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Introduction to basic principles and characteristics of economic systems. Primary emphasis is on macroeconomic issues, including national income determination, monetary and fiscal policy, and current economic problems. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 151 — Global Power and Politics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course is designed to give students an understanding of world politics by examining historical and current events and issues. It explores topics of international relations – origins of wars, conditions for peace, and conflicts over wealth and resources. Students will learn how international actors interact with each other. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 171 — Introductory Sociology

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Study of patterned social behavior and the interrelationships between individual life experience and the social structure that helps to shape it. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 200 — Personal Finance

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces terminology, concepts, and practices of personal finance: the financial planning process, consumer loans, home ownership, saving for retirement, time value of money, interest compounding, inflation, risk diversification, behavioral finance, mutual funds, bonds, and stocks. Tools to evaluate financial decisions at different stages of life are provided. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 201 — Contemporary Issues in Economics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course covers leading contemporary economic problems, with specific topics chosen from current and recent policy debates such as immigration, health care reform, national debt and executive pay. The objective is to provide a critical economics perspective about these issues, utilizing economic reasoning, theory, and principles. (G4: Social Sciences).
Prerequisite(s): SS 141.

SS 202 — Bollywood and the Making of India

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course is cross-listed with FI 200. Bollywood films are used as a medium to examine changes in contemporary India, including the broader concerns about colonialism, postcolonial, and hegemonic nationalism. Issues from modernity and economic liberalization, to sexuality, caste, class, religious identities, and terror, all in the context of state-building—the making of India, are considered. (G7: Humanities; G9 Other World Civilizations).

SS 203 — Study Abroad in Greece: The Ideals of Excellence in Ancient Greece

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

A study abroad course on how the Greeks pursued excellence in almost every aspect of their lives: in their art and architecture, in their role as citizens, in public speaking, in their physical and mental development, and in their moral education. Examines the Greek ideals of excellence, through readings of classic texts and daily visits to museums and/or historic sites.

SS 204 — Economic Growth

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Why are some countries rich and others so poor?  Will poor nations catch up in the face of declining stocks of natural resources or trail behind the richest ones? This course focuses on both the historical experience of countries that are currently rich and the process of catch-up among poor countries. Topics include population growth, accumulation of physical and human capital, technological change, natural resources, income distribution, geography, government, and culture. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141.

SS 205 — Introduction to Accounting & Financial Management

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course covers accounting and financial concepts as they apply to Advertising and Marketing Communications related businesses and initiatives. Students study Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), learn how to read and develop financial statements for their business and make investment decisions. They learn how to evaluate the financial health of different companies by using ratio analysis.
Prerequisite(s): SS 141.

SS 231 — Personality

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Emphasizes normal personality development as viewed from a variety of perspectives, including social, educational, biological, and psychodynamic factors. Students apply these psychological principles to problems of everyday living and gain an understanding of both normal and deviant reactions to life events. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 131.

SS 232 — Developmental Psychology

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Studies the development of psychological, emotional, social, and biological processes from prenatal stage and birth to maturity. Emphasis is on critical stages in development as well as application of psychological principles to everyday situations. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 131.

SS 237 — Industrial Psychology

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Applies psychological principles to issues in the workplace. Personnel selection, training, leadership, motivation, job satisfaction, performance appraisal, and stress are explored to provide future leaders, managers, and technical specialists with information and skills to enhance their interpersonal and organizational effectiveness. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 242 — Microeconomics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Examines the principles underlying the behavior of business firms, resource owners, and consumers within a system of price-making markets. Emphasis is on pricing, resource allocation, cost analysis, price determination under market structures ranging from competition to monopoly, and a functional approach to the distribution of income. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141.

SS 243 — History of Economic Thought

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course traces the rise of major economic philosophies from pre-Quesnay through Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Keynes and beyond. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of broad-scale models of social reality, and their relation to the times in which economists lived. Students trace the contributions of prominent philosophers within the context of the changing views of economic science, and evaluate the applicability of these views for understanding today's world. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 244 — Fashion Economics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students study economic theories and concepts focused on fashion and the fashion industry. Topics include market structure, supply-and-demand analysis, consumer behavior, market competition, historical developments, international environment, and regulation. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 and SS 242.

SS 251 — American Government and Politics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Examines the organization and operation of the American political system, including analysis of present national policies and problems. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 272 — Sex Roles, Marriage, and Family in Transition

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Sociological study of sex roles and relationships in modern society. Analysis of traditional marriage and family systems, new alternatives, and future trends. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 275 — Sociology of Race and Ethnic Relations

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An overview of the major concepts and theories defining the nature of race and ethnic relations, prejudice, and discrimination. Strategies for reducing prejudice and discrimination and promoting intergroup harmony are addressed. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 277 — Cultural Expressions of Non-Western Dress and Fashion

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces students to the sociocultural meanings of ethnic dress. Students examine case studies from non-Western cultures to understand how dress reflects the values and beliefs of traditional cultures, and how ethnic dress has become integrated into today's fashions. (G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 278 — Latinos in the United States: A Sociological Perspective

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course provides an understanding of the socioeconomic, political, and cultural impact of Latinos in the United States. Students explore sociological issues including race, ethnicity, urbanization, gender, immigration, and social mobility that have helped shape Latino culture and values. Comparisons with other ethnic/racial groups in the United States, as well as the differences within the Latino community itself, are addressed.

SS 299 — Independent Study in the Social Sciences

1-3 credit

Prerequisite(s): a minimum 3.5 GPA and approval of instructor, chairperson, and dean for Liberal Arts.

SS 300 — Sociology of Everyday Life

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course provides students with a sociological understanding of everyday life from a micro-level analysis. Using theoretical perspectives such as symbolic interaction, labeling, and social constructionism, students will examine how social interaction creates and sustains the everyday social worlds people live in, ranging from an airport departure hall to social media sites. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 171.

SS 301 — Luxury: A Socio-Cultural Perspective

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces students to a sociological analysis of the idea and the practice of “luxury” from Western and non-Western perspectives, and they also learn how luxury, as a social arrangement that is related to high culture, is produced, reproduced, and maintained by various institutions around the world. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 302 — Economics of Energy and Fossil Fuels

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

The course discusses energy markets and especially the economic history, extraction and consumption of the fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas). We also discuss energy and environmental polices such as the Cap-and-trade, cap-and-share systems, net-metering or a carbon tax. We will also provide examples of alternative and more sustainable energy policies from other countries. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141.

SS 303 — LGBTQ in Society: A Global Perspective

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces students to the field of LGBTQ (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer) Studies, focusing on the sociological dimension of the study of this population both in the West and globally. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 304 — Introduction to Caribbean Studies

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course is cross-listed with MC 304. Introduction to modern Caribbean States and societies with emphasis on their economies, politics and cultures. Students explore current global trends and their impact on the Caribbean region and its diaspora. (G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 306 — Kimono and Fashion: A Socio-Cultural Perspective

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

The multifaceted history and symbolic nature of the Japanese kimono in relation to the social categories of class and gender. Explores a wide range of conventional kimono variations in addition to distinct kimono worn by those in specific cultural contexts, such as Geisha, Maiko, and Kabuki actors (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 307 — Emotions in Society

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

How are our emotions shaped by society? This course examines sociological theories and research on why we feel what we feel, applying these to social issues such as capitalism, climate destruction, racial injustice, and war to examine shame, pride, sympathy, denial, happiness, and trauma. Students examine their own emotions in order to experiment with thinking more critically about both their own lives and society as a whole. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 308 — White Gold: Sugar, Power and the Creation of Atlantic Capitalism (Interdisciplinary)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This is an interdisciplinary course cross-listed with MC 308. In this team-taught course, students study the political and economic implications of the rise of sugar to dietary prominence and the literary representations of this phenomenon. Students examine the human costs of consumer behavior. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 309 — Tattoos and Body Modification

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines tattoos and various types of body modification, such as facial piercing and scarification, in Asian, Southeast Asian and Polynesian cultures. Students are introduced to ethnographic studies on tattoos and other corporal adornment practices and learn how the biological human body is transformed into a social canvas. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 310 — Economic Globalization: Problem or Panacea?

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course explores the benefits, risks and drawbacks of economic globalization from the standpoints of both developing and developed countries. Economic theory will be introduced and explained as it applies to various facets of globalization in order to better understand, analyze and evaluate the phenomenon of globalization. (G4: Social Sciences).
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 and SS 151.

SS 311 — Environmental Psychology

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course explores how human behavior and cultural values shape, and are shaped by, natural and built environments. Topics include: environmental perception and cognition, place attachment and psychological experiences of home, spatial implications of power and inequality, and typologies such as institutions, public space, workplaces, and play spaces. (G4: Social Sciences).
Prerequisite(s): SS 131.

SS 312 — Sensation & Perception

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines the basic human senses and the psychological perceptions that help us interpret and respond to our environment. Students apply sensory and perceptual phenomena to concepts in their major fields of study and examine current applications of sensory and perceptual phenomena in a variety of fields. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 131.

SS 313 — Cultural Awareness, Design Responsibility, and the Law

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course investigates the legal, financial, and social implications of cultural appropriation and the misuse of cultural property. A variety of indigenous and cultural groups ranging from the Wixáritari people of Mexico to the hip-hop community will be examined through case studies. Students develop strategies of how to design and collaborate with cultural groups in a sensitive and responsible manner. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 334 — The Psychology of Color

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Examines the importance of color and its influences on behavior. Topics include the biological and perceptual characteristics of color, fundamental color research, societal and cultural influences on the meanings and uses of color, adaptations of color in both natural and manmade environments, and the interaction between personality and color. Special attention is given to the application of color in both industry and everyday life. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 131 or approval of chairperson.

SS 335 — Abnormal Psychology

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course is designed to help students understand the symptoms, causes, and treatment of psychological disorders and the contemporary issues facing mental health practitioners and researchers. Issues related to abnormal psychology are presented from theoretical research and clinical perspectives. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 131.

SS 336 — Psychology for Sustainability

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students explore the psychological relationship between humans and their natural and built environments to gain insight into environmental problems and generate solutions. Topics include conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior, social norms and influence, the role of contingencies, the neurotoxic effects of pollution, and the psychology of environmental stress. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 337 — Crime in the Global, Digital Society - Honors

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students are familiarized with critical and contemporary sociological theories of crime. They will apply these theories to global and local empirical case studies and examine how the nature, extent, causes and control of crime and criminal offending should be understood within interrelated local, transnational, and global societal contexts. Qualification for Presidential Scholars Program or 3.5 GPA with approval of Dean of Liberal Arts. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 338 — Happiness & Human Flourishing - Honors

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students explore the psychological aspects of a fulfilling and flourishing life by critically reviewing and analyzing scientific work drawn from the field of positive psychology. Topics include happiness and positive affect, well-being, empathy, friendship, love, achievement, creativity, mindfulness, spirituality, and humor. Qualification for Presidential Scholars Program or 3.5 GPA with approval of Dean of Liberal Arts. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 339 — Introduction to Development Economics - Honors

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course introduces students to development economics and investigates why some countries are poorer than others and what economic policies help countries achieve growth (G4: Social Sciences).
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 and SS 151.

SS 340 — The Psychology of Gender, Perception and Self-Expression

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Through critical engagement with psychological theories of gender and cognition, this course challenges students to think how gender affects our sense of self, how we communicate that self, and how others perceive us. It encourages students to imagine new possibilities for how we embody our identity and interact based on fashion.
Prerequisite(s): SS 131.

SS 341 — Women and Global Politics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course will examine how gender intersects in, and shapes, international relations through an examination of issues in international conflict and in the international political economy. The course will focus on the global women’s movement as a considerable player in international politics, incorporating the experiences of women as well as feminist analyses. (G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 343 — Labor Economics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Examines labor economics and labor institutions' role in the U.S. economy. Major subjects include the changing labor force and its composition, labor markets, labor unionism, collective bargaining, labor legislation, and government regulation. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 and SS 242.

SS 345 — Fundamentals of Finance for Fashion Industries

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course focuses on the basic principles and concepts of international finance relevant to the fashion-related industries. Topics include the world financial system and institutions, and financial instruments and their use from a practical standpoint. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 and SS 242.

SS 352 — Contemporary Western Europe

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Introduction to the Western European countries and societies and their relations with each other and with the rest of the world. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 353 — Latin America Today

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Introduction to modern Latin American states and societies with surveys of their economies, politics, and cultures. Also explores inter-American and international relations. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 354 — Comparative Political Systems

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Study of political systems with a global perspective; compares and contrasts contemporary political ideologies, institutions, and processes from democracies to authoritarian regimes, advanced industrialized economies to developing countries. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 356 — Asia in Motion: National, International, and Transnational Relations

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Examines the complexity, diversity, and dynamics of East Asian and Southeast Asian politics. The course analyzes Asia and its moves toward modernity in terms of politics, economics, and culture. Topics include modernization, post-World War II political settings, and post-Cold War regional integration. (G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 374 — Cross-Cultural Studies

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course provides conceptual and practical knowledge of the societies and cultures, economies, histories, and institutions of non-Western societies. Special attention is paid to the distinctive features of Japan and India. Students are introduced to the range and significance of cultural differences and will be prepared to adapt to these cultural differences as they move into international arenas. (G4: Social Science; G9: Other World Civilizations)
Prerequisite(s): two introductory Social Sciences courses (SS 131, SS 141, SS 151, or SS 171) or approval of chairperson.

SS 376 — Clothing and Society

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Examines the development of dress, adornment, and appearance as a nonverbal mode of communication and explores the meaning of clothing in modern American society. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): two introductory Social Sciences courses (SS 131, SS 141, SS 151, or SS 171) or approval of chairperson.

SS 378 — Asian Global Popular Culture

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students examine the global production, consumption, and reproduction of popular culture products in Asian countries, such as Korea, Japan, and India. Cultural products such as films, television sitcoms, pop music, comic books, and animation from South and East Asian societies are examined from local and global perspectives, and analyzed using social scientific tools and methodologies. (G4: Social Science; G9: Other World Civilizations).

SS 379 — Sociology of the Digital Era

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course explores the impact of digital information and communication technologies (ICT’s) in everyday life. Students examine how digital ICT’s have transformed social relations, social structures, identity formation processes, and cultural, political, and economic practices. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 385 — Social Psychology

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Human behaviors such as aggression, prejudice, attraction, attitude formation, conformity, helping, and group processes are examined with particular emphasis on their current applications. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 131.

SS 386 — Youth Subculture, Identity, and Fashion: A Sociological Perspective

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course explores youth subcultures, in relation to gender, race and class identity. Students are introduced to various case studies of youth subcultures around the world, including Goth, Punk, and Lolita, and analyze how their values, norms, attitudes and beliefs are reflected on their styles. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations)
Prerequisite(s): SS 171 or SS 277 or SS 374.

SS 391 — Economic Ideas - Past and Present - Honors Program

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Traces the rise of major economic philosophies from before Quesnay through Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Keynes, and beyond. The evolution of broad-scale models of social reality and their relationships to the times in which economists lived are emphasized. (G4: Social Sciences).

SS 392 — Psychopathology and Modern Life (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students learn the symptoms, causes, and treatment of psychological disorders and the contemporary issues facing mental health researchers and practitioners. Psychopathology is presented as both a scientific and a clinical endeavor that gives students the clearest understanding of the field. Information from the text and lectures is based on current research, findings, and different theoretical approaches. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts.

SS 393 — Politics in the Middle East (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

The most significant issues in Middle Eastern politics are presented in three parts: an examination of the ethnic, geopolitical, and religious composition of the Middle East; an exploration of issues of conflict, including the Arab-Israeli dispute and the Persian Gulf War; and a study of the nature of economic and military cooperation among countries in the Middle East and with other countries. Topics analyzed include economic development, moves toward democratization, and regional alliances. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations)
Prerequisite(s): qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts.

SS 394 — Global Financial Markets (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course discusses the general principles and main concepts of international finance. Topics such as the world financial system and institutions, global financial instruments, and interruptions in the international financial markets (i.e. the financial crisis of 2008, the East Asian financial crisis) are addressed. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts.

SS 395 — International Conflict in the 21st Century (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines the nature of international conflict in the 21st century. Students analyze how international conflicts have occurred through time while examining the question of why people and states take particular types of actions. Students review case studies that demonstrate examples of post-cold war conflict including terrorism, civil war, and international intervention. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations)
Prerequisite(s): qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts.

SS 396 — Social Experiments: Answering the Questions of Social Psychology (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Classic and contemporary experiments in social behavior are reviewed, and methodological procedures in social psychology research emphasized. Student teams design and conduct appropriate, controlled experiments on topics relating to social psychology, including attitude and stereotypical conformity, aggression, or helping behavior. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): qualification for Presidential Scholars Program or 3.5 GPA with approval for dean of Liberal Arts.

SS 397 — Religion and Global Politics (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course is designed to guide students to understand and reflect on how religion influences global politics. Students discuss the role religion plays in driving contemporary political events in multiple, multifaceted and mysterious ways. (G7: Humanities).

SS 442 — Environmental Economics and Policy

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

The foundations of environmental and natural resource economics are examined. Current economic approaches to the valuation of environmental issues, including economic incentive policies, internalization of environmental costs, public policy, and related multilateral trade issues, are discussed. Students analyze property rights as well as uses and restrictions of the global commons. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 or SS 242.

SS 443 — International Economics

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Reviews the origins of modern international economic theory and discusses present patterns of trade and finance, including the balance of payments and its economic effects, exchange rates, international commodity agreements, and tariff policies. Includes an analysis of the relationship between international economics and current U.S. economic problems. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 and SS 242.

SS 444 — Presidential Scholars Senior Seminar (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

The Presidential Scholars Senior Seminar provides students an opportunity to explore topics of their choosing in a culminating academic project. Students will narrow topics, develop research questions, employ research methods, and produce a thesis/creative project with an accompanying presentation of their findings. Qualification for Presidential Scholars program or 3.5 GPA Dean of Liberal Arts.

SS 445 — Money and Banking

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Reviews the monetary and banking system of the United States, with emphasis on its structure and regulation. The theoretical framework of the monetary system and its relation to monetary policy are also studied. (G4: Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): SS 242.

SS 446 — Economies of Latin America

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

The course reviews modern international economic theory and its application to the Latin American economies. Major topics include trade theory and regulation, industrial policies, regional trading agreements, and the role of multinational enterprises and financial issues. Students examine theoretical concepts within the context of the historical and current economic experiences of Latin America. (G4: Social Sciences; G9: Other World Civilizations)
Prerequisite(s): SS 141 and SS 242.

SS 499 — Independent Study in the Social Sciences

1-3 credit

Prerequisite(s): a minimum 3.5 GPA and approval of instructor, chairperson, and dean for Liberal Arts.