FIT 's General Education Requirements and Courses

FIT students who matriculated after fall 2000 must fulfill General Education requirements in order to receive a bachelor’s degree. These requirements are built into the FIT curriculum and in conjunction with major and related area courses in a degree program. An FIT General Education course cannot be used to meet more than one General Education area. 

At the Associate level Art & Design majors take 18 credits of General Education/Liberal Arts courses plus 6 credits of Art/Design History courses (to fulfill the NASAD accreditation requirement), totaling 24 credits. Business & Technology and Film & Media majors take 24 credits of General Education/Liberal Arts courses at the associate level. 

At the AAS level, a second English course is required for all majors. English courses cover a wide variety of General Education areas.

All FIT students including transfers are required to complete a total of 30 SUNY General Education/Liberal Arts credits (10 courses) in a minimum of seven of the ten areas in order to receive a Bachelor degree.   This General Education structure is effective for FIT students entering AAS programs  in Fall 2014 and for those entering BS/BFA programs in Fall 2015.

To complete these requirements for a bachelor degree, students must take 30 credits of General Education approved courses. This distribution is as follows
1.  Take one (1) course in each of the following areas (9 credits): Basic Communications (G1), Mathematics (G2), and Natural Science (G3). 

2.  Take four (4) different courses from four (4) different areas(12 credits) in the G4-G10 categories: Social Sciences (G4), Western Civilization (G5), The Arts (G6), Humanities (G7), Foreign Language (G8), Other World Civilizations (G9), and American History (G10).

3. Take three (3) courses not previously taken in any of the ten (10) areas that meet SUNY General Education approval (9 credits).

While the Registrar’s Office and the Academic Advisement Center monitor each student’s progress in the fulfillment of SUNY and FIT's General Education requirements, final responsibility for completing the requirements rests with the student. A SUNY General Education requirement completed at one SUNY campus will not have to be repeated at FIT.

Code General Education Area
G1Basic Communication
G2Mathematics
G3Natural Sciences
G4Social Sciences
G5Western Civilization
G6The Arts
G7Humanities
G8Foreign Language
G9Other World Civilizations (Non-Western Civilizations)
G10American History

Approved General Education Courses

The following FIT courses have been certified by SUNY as meeting specific General Education student learning outcomes and have been approved to meet General Education requirements. Additional courses will be added to this list as they are developed. 

G1 BASIC COMMUNICATION Students produce coherent texts within common college-level written forms; demonstrate the ability to revise and improve such texts; research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details; develop proficiency in oral discourse; and evaluate an oral presentation according to established criteria.

Approved Basic Communication courses:

EN 121English Composition3
EN 241Professional Speech Communication3
EN 242Public Speaking3
EN 362Creative Nonfiction (Honors)3

G2 MATHEMATICS Students will demonstrate the ability to interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables, and schematics; represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically, and verbally; employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems; estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness; and recognize the limits of mathematical and statistical methods.

Approved Mathematics courses:

MA 142Geometry and the Art of Design (formerly MA 242)3
MA 161Mathematical Ideas3
MA 213Quantitative Methods3
MA 222Statistical Analysis3
MA 231Precalculus (formerly MA 131)3
MA 241Topics in Probability and Geometry3
MA 311Mathematical Modeling for Business Applications3
MA 321Data Analysis for Business Applications3
MA 331Calculus3
MA 361Number Theory3
MA 391Mathematics of the Ancient World in Its Cultural and Historic Context (Honors)3
MA 392The Mathematics of Personal Finance (Honors)3

G3 NATURAL SCIENCES Students demonstrate an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis; and application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.

Approved Natural Sciences courses:

SC 111Introduction to the Physical Sciences3
SC 112Earth Science3.5
SC 121Introduction to Biological Science3
SC 122Field Biology3
SC 145/045Survey of General and Organic Chemistry4
SC 146/046Basic Chemistry for Cosmetics and Fragrances3
SC 147The Forensics of Fiber Analysis3
SC 245Chemistry of the Everyday World3
SC 253Ecology and Environmental Problems3
SC 326Human Nutrition3
SC 332Color and Light3
SC 032Color Science Laboratory1
SC 391Crime Scene Chemistry (Honors)4

G4 SOCIAL SCIENCES Students demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis. They also demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, models, and issues of at least one discipline in the social sciences.

Approved Social Sciences courses:

SS 131General Psychology3
SS 141Macroeconomics3
SS 151Introduction to World Affairs3
SS 171Introductory Sociology3
SS 231Personality3
SS 232Developmental Psychology3
SS 237Industrial Psychology3
SS 242Microeconomics3
SS 243History of Economic Thought3
SS 244Fashion Economics3
SS 251American Government and Politics3
SS 272Sex Roles, Marriage, and Family in Transition3
SS 273The Study of Social Problems: Prostitution, Drugs, and Other Issues3
SS 275Sociology of Race and Ethnic Relations3
SS 334The Psychology of Color3
SS 335Abnormal Psychology3
SS 343Labor Economics3
SS 345Fundamentals of Finance for Fashion Industries3
SS 352Contemporary Western Europe3
SS 353Latin America Today3
SS 354Comparative Political Systems3
SS 374Cross-Cultural Studies3
SS 376Clothing and Society3
SS 378Asian Global Popular Culture3
SS 379Sociology of the Digital Area3
SS 385Social Psychology3
SS 386Youth Subculture, Identity, and Fashion: A Sociological Perspective3
SS 392Psychopathology and Modern Life (Honors)3
SS 393Politics in the Middle East (Honors)3
SS 394Global Financial Markets (Honors)3
SS 395International Conflict in the 21st Century (Honors)3
SS 396Social Experiments: Answering the Questions of Social Psychology (Honors)3
SS 443International Economics3
SS 445Money and Banking3
SS 446Economies of Latin America3

G5 WESTERN CIVILIZATION Students demonstrate knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc., of Western civilization and relate the development of Western civilization to that of other regions of the world. Courses that satisfy the Western Civilization learning outcomes should be focused on a foundational aspect of the development of Western civilization, and not on a narrowly defined topic or chronological period.

Approved Western Civilization courses:

EN 392Greek Myths and Their Transformations (Honors)3
HA 111History of Western Art and Civilization: Ancient Prehistory Through the Middle Ages3
HA 112History of Western Art and Civilization: Renaissance to the Modern Era3
HA 213Rome: A Cultural History in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture3
HA 311Medieval Art3
HA 396Art and Patronage in the Italian Renaissance (Honors)3
HI 395Big Ideas in History: Smith, Darwin, Marx, Freud3
PL 391Ancient Greek Philosophy (Honors)3
PL 392The Old and New Testaments in the History of Ideas--Honors3

G6 THE ARTS (Liberal Arts) Students demonstrate an understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein. Note that while the majority of G6 courses are also liberal arts courses, several are not and will not count towards the liberal arts requirement for a bachelor degree. These courses designated as Liberal Arts meet NYSED's definition of a liberal arts course.

Only these Liberal Arts courses meet AAS General Education requirements:

EN 251Theater Arts (LA)3
EN 254Drama: From Script to Live Theater (Winter Session only) (LA)3
EN 324Writing on The Arts (LA)3
EN 361Creative Writing (LA)3
EN 363Fiction Writing (LA)3
EN 364Poetry Writing (LA)3
EN 391The Creative Imagination: Theory and Process (Honors) (LA)3
EN 397Women in U.S. Theater (Honors) (LA)3
EN 398Film Art/Film Critic (Honors) (LA)3
EN 399The Craft of Writing Poetry (Honors) (LA)3
FI 256Screenwriting I (LA)3
FI 323Sexuality in Cinema (LA)3
FI 356Screenwriting II (LA)3
FI 371Film Art, Film Critic (LA)3
HA 213Rome: A Cultural History in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture (LA)3
HA 214Art In New York (LA)3
HA 244Art and Architecture in Paris (LA)3
HA 251Film Genres: Horror (LA)3
HA 252History of Russian and Soviet Film (LA)3
HA 333Contemporary Photography and New Media (LA)3
HA 348History of the Modern Printed Image (LA)3
HA 381The Word and the Page: A History of Writing and Books (Honors) (LA)3
HA 394History of New York Architecture (Honors) (LA)3
HP 231America at Home: Product Styles from 1900 to Contemporary (LA)3
MU 202Survey of Latin American Music (LA)3
MU 203Survey of American Music (LA)3
MU 391(Honors) Masterpieces of Music in the European Classical Tradition (LA)3
PE 215Dance in New York: A Survey of Live Performance (LA)3
PE 216History of Ballet and Modern Dance (LA)3
PE 217Urban Dance: History and Social Context (LA)3

G6 THE ARTS (Non-Liberal Arts) Students demonstrate an understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein. Note that while the majority of G6 courses are also liberal arts courses, several are not and will not count towards the liberal arts requirement for a bachelor degree. These courses designated as Non-Liberal Arts do not meet NYSED's definition of a liberal arts course.

These Non-Liberal Arts courses do not meet AAS General Education requirements:

AC 362Video Studio Production ((Not LA))3
AD 382Advertising Concept Development II (Not LA)1.5
AD 383Communications Strategy Planning and Brand Campaigns (Not LA)3.5
AR 101Fashion Art and Design (Not LA)1.5
CD 113Three-Dimensional Design (Not LA)1.5
CD 115Design Studio I (Not LA)3
DE 101Principles of Display and Exhibit Design: Small Scale (Not LA)2
FA 101Painting (Not LA)1.5
FA 102Painting (Not LA)1.5
FA 103Painting (Not LA)1.5
FA 104Sculpture - Basic (Not LA)1.5
FA 105Life Drawing (Not LA)1.5
FA 107Basic Design (Not LA)1.5
FA 108Basic Drawing (Not LA)1
FA 113Fundamentals of Design I: 2D and Color (Not LA)1.5
FA 114Fundamentals of Design II: 3D Form and Structure (Not LA)1.5
FA 116Creative Media (Not LA)2
FA 131Life Drawing I (Not LA)1.5
FA 132Life Drawing II (Not LA)1.5
FA 141Drawing I (Not LA)1.5
FA 142Drawing II (Not LA)1.5
FA 202Basic Design: 3D (Not LA)1
FF 112Fashion Art and Design II (Not LA)2
FF 113Fashion Art and Design for One-Year Program (Not LA)5
GD 311Graphic Design I (Not LA)3
GD 312Graphic Design II (Not LA)3
IL 123Principles of Illustration I (Not LA)1.5
IL 131Illustration Life Drawing I (Not LA)1.5
IL 302Drawing for Animation I (Not LA)2
IL 303Drawing for Animation II (Not LA)1.5
IL 362The Illustrator's Heritage I (Not LA)3
IL 364The Illustrator's Heritage II (Not LA)3
IL 374Book Illustration I (Not LA)1.5
JD 101Introduction to Jewelry Fabrication (Not LA)2
PE 111Modern Dance (Not LA)1
PE 113Jazz Dance (Not LA)1
PE 114Ballet I (Not LA)1
PE 116Afro-Caribbean Dance (Not LA)1
PE 118Flamenco Dance (Not LA)1
PE 119Dances of the Middle East and India (Not LA)1
PE 181Contemporary Urban Dance (Not LA)1
PE 214Ballet II (Not LA)1
PE 219Dances of the Middle East and India II (Not LA)1
PH 116Photography Basics (Not LA)2
PH 117Principles of Photography Including Darkroom Instruction (Not LA)2
PH 162Photographic Styling (Not LA)2
TD 141Nature Studies (Not LA)1.5
TD 142Advanced Nature Studies (Not LA)1.5
TY 101Introduction to Toy Design (Not LA)1.5
TY 411Toy Design II and Product Update (Not LA)2
TY 416Hard Toy: Design (Not LA)1.5

G7 HUMANITIES Students demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas within the General Education requirements.

Approved Humanities courses:

EN 231Short Fiction3
EN 232Perspectives on American Literature3
EN 233Poetry3
EN 234Gay and Lesbian Literature3
EN 235African-American Literature3
EN 236Major Writers of the Western World3
EN 238Comedy3
EN 253Dramatic Literature3
EN 257Major Movements in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Film3
EN 271Literature and History: The Development of American Culture to 18653
EN 272Identity in America: History and Literature, 1865 to Present3
EN 273Literature of India3
EN 275Literature of the Sixties3
EN 278Science Fiction3
EN 281Chinese Cinema3
EN 324Writing on The Arts3
EN 325Playwriting3
EN 331Introduction to Shakespeare3
EN 333Modern Literature: The Spirit of the 20th Century3
EN 334The Novel3
EN 335Working Women in the United States: 1865 to Present3
EN 336From Gothic to Horror: Literature of Fear3
EN 371Chinese Odyssey: Introduction to Chinese Literature3
EN 373The Graphic Novel3
EN 381Asian Fiction: Regional Selections (Honors)3
EN 382Contemporary Chinese Cinema (Honors)3
EN 391The Creative Imagination: Theory and Process (Honors)3
EN 392Greek Myths and Their Transformations (Honors)3
EN 393Shakespeare (Honors)3
EN 394American Lives (Honors)3
EN 395Travel Literature and the Travel Essay (Honors)3
EN 396Shakespeare's Plays (Honors)3
FI 111Introduction to Film3
FI 221HIstory of Film, beginnings to 19593
FI 222History of Film, 1960-present3
FI 272Introduction to Television Studies3
FI 321Film Theory and Criticism, An Introduction3
FI 324The Romantic Comedy3
FI 331Film Genres: Crime Stories3
FI 341French Cinema3
FI 342Contemporary Korean Cinema3
HA 111History of Western Art and Civilization: Ancient Prehistory Through the Middle Ages3
HA 112History of Western Art and Civilization: Renaissance to the Modern Era3
HA 121Cities and Civilizations: The Eastern Mediterranean World, c. 3000 BCE-1000 CE3
HA 212Renaissance Art in Florence3
HA 213Rome: A Cultural History in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture3
HA 214Art In New York3
HA 215History of Menswear3
HA 216American Indian Art and Civilization3
HA 217History of Avant-Garde Film3
HA 218Art and Myth in the Classical World3
HA 219African American Art3
HA 221East Asian Art and Civilization3
HA 223African Art and Civilization3
HA 224Pre-Columbian Art and Civilization3
HA 225Art and Civilization of India3
HA 226Art and Civilization of the Islamic World3
HA 228Oceanic Art and Civilization3
HA 229Korean Art and Civilization3
HA 231Modern Art3
HA 232Dada and Surrealism3
HA 234Warhol and Pop Art3
HA 241History of Photojournalism3
HA 244Art and Architecture in Paris3
HA 251Film Genres: Horror3
HA 252History of Russian and Soviet Film3
HA 271Japanese Art and Civilization3
HA 311Medieval Art3
HA 312Women in Western Art from the Late 18th Century to the Present3
HA 314History of American Art3
HA 316The Bauhaus3
HA 317Italian Renaissance Art & Civilization3
HA 331Contemporary Art and Culture: 1945 to the Present3
HA 332Modern Architecture3
HA 333Contemporary Photography and New Media3
HA 342History of Textile Design3
HA 343History of Photography3
HA 344History of Western Costume3
HA 345History of Industrial Design3
HA 347Costume and Fashion in Film3
HA 348History of the Modern Printed Image3
HA 381The Word and the Page: A History of Writing and Books (Honors)3
HA 391The Bauhaus (Honors)3
HA 392The Art of Venice: Titian to Tiepolo (Honors)3
HA 395Studies in American Indian Art and Culture (Honors)3
HA 396Art and Patronage in the Italian Renaissance (Honors)3
HA 397Studies in Maya Art and Culture (Honors)3
HA 411Western Theories of Art3
HA 462Art and Ethics3
HI 392(Honors) Religion and Religious Dissent in American History to the Civil War3
HI 395Big Ideas in History: Smith, Darwin, Marx, Freud3
IT 251Italian Cinema3
IT 341Introduction to Italian Literature3
IT 342Writing Women of the Italian Renaissance3
IT 345Food for Thought: Gastronomy in Italian Literature and Culture3
MC 331Film Genres: Melodrama3
PL 141Introduction to Western Philosophy3
PL 143Introduction to Asian Philosophies3
PL 211Informal Logic: A Guide to Clear Thinking3
PL 321Philosophy of Art3
PL 391Ancient Greek Philosophy (Honors)3
PL 392The Old and New Testaments in the History of Ideas--Honors3
PL 431Philosophy: Ethics3
SP 251Latin American Fiction: 1960-Present3
SP 351From Modern to Contemporary Latin American Women Writers3

G8 FOREIGN LANGUAGE Students demonstrate a basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language and knowledge of the distinctive features of the culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.

Approved Foreign Language courses:

CH 111Chinese I3
CH 112Chinese II3
CH 213Chinese III3
CH 214Chinese IV3
FR 111French I3
FR 112French II3
FR 213French III3
FR 214French IV3
FR 315Introduction to French Literature3
IT 111Italian I3
IT 112Italian II3
IT 122Italian Conversation I3
IT 132Italian in Florence3
IT 213Italian III3
IT 214Italian IV3
IT 311Italian for Business3
IT 341Introduction to Italian Literature3
IT 342Writing Women of the Italian Renaissance3
JA 111Japanese I3
JA 112Japanese II3
JA 213Japanese III3
JA 214Japanese IV3
SP 111Spanish I3
SP 112Spanish II3
SP 132Spanish in Santiago de Compostela3
SP 141Spanish for Spanish Speakers I3
SP 142Spanish for Spanish Speakers II3
SP 213Spanish III3
SP 214Spanish IV3
SP 311Spanish for Business (formerly SP 215)3
SP 351From Modern to Contemporary Latin American Women Writers3

G9 OTHER WORLD CIVILIZATIONS (NON-WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS) Students demonstrate knowledge of either a broad outline of world history or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. Courses in this area have to be non-Eurocentric and non-U.S. in focus. In addition to courses on the civilizations of Asia or Africa, this would, for example, allow courses on the civilizations of indigenous peoples of the Americas.

 

Approved Other World Civilizations courses:

EN 257Major Movements in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Film3
EN 273Literature of India3
EN 281Chinese Cinema3
EN 371Chinese Odyssey: Introduction to Chinese Literature3
EN 381Asian Fiction: Regional Selections (Honors)3
EN 382Contemporary Chinese Cinema (Honors)3
FI 342Contemporary Korean Cinema3
HA 121Cities and Civilizations: The Eastern Mediterranean World, c. 3000 BCE-1000 CE3
HA 216American Indian Art and Civilization3
HA 221East Asian Art and Civilization3
HA 223African Art and Civilization3
HA 224Pre-Columbian Art and Civilization3
HA 225Art and Civilization of India3
HA 226Art and Civilization of the Islamic World3
HA 227Archaeological Excavation in Israel (Summer)3
HA 228Oceanic Art and Civilization3
HA 229Korean Art and Civilization3
HA 271Japanese Art and Civilization3
HA 315Ethnographic Film3
HA 395Studies in American Indian Art and Culture (Honors)3
HA 397Studies in Maya Art and Culture (Honors)3
HA 398Architecture and Faith: Ancient and Islamic Cities (Honors)3
HI 206Pasts in the Present: Modern Chinese History since 18003
PL 143Introduction to Asian Philosophies3
SS 151Introduction to World Affairs3
SS 277Cultural Expressions of Non-Western Dress and Fashion3
SS 353Latin America Today3
SS 354Comparative Political Systems3
SS 355Contemporary African Politics3
SS 356Asia in Motion: National, International, and Transnational Relations3
SS 374Cross-Cultural Studies3
SS 378Asian Global Popular Culture3
SS 386Youth Subculture, Identity, and Fashion: A Sociological Perspective3
SS 393Politics in the Middle East (Honors)3
SS 395International Conflict in the 21st Century (Honors)3
SS 446Economies of Latin America3

G10 AMERICAN HISTORY Students demonstrate knowledge of a basic narrative of American history: political, economic, social, and cultural, including knowledge of unity and diversity in American society; knowledge of common institutions in American society and how they have affected different groups; and understanding of America’s evolving relationship with the rest of the world.

Approved American History courses:

EN 271Literature and History: The Development of American Culture to 18653
EN 272Identity in America: History and Literature, 1865 to Present3
EN 274Voices of Civil Rights in American History3
EN 335Working Women in the United States: 1865 to Present3
HA 219African American Art3
HA 314History of American Art3
HI 202U.S. History: Civil War- Present3
HI 203Distant Neighbors: A History of Latin America and the U.S.3
HI 204Leisure in America3
HI 207Hollywood: A History3
HI 391U.S. History and Culture: 1860 to Present3
HI 392(Honors) Religion and Religious Dissent in American History to the Civil War3
HI 393New York City and the Invention of America3
HI 394Rebellion and Resistance in America3

Competencies

In addition to the areas described above, SUNY requires the General Education competencies of critical thinking and information management. Both are covered in courses throughout the FIT curriculum.

CRITICAL THINKING Students identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments as they occur in their own or others’ work, and develop well-reasoned arguments.

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Students perform the basic operations of personal computer use, understand and use basic research techniques, and locate, evaluate, and synthesize information from a variety of sources.