LA 221 — U.S. History: Civil War to Present

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

An introduction to American history, this course moves from a brief view of American geography, economics, and government to a more focused examination of the social, political, and economic experience from the Civil War through the Cold War and to the present. Students are introduced to basic historical methodology and learn to apply these techniques through critical reading, analytical writing, and verbal presentations. (G10: American History)
Prerequisite(s): EN 121 or EN 362.

LA 224 — Distant Neighbors: A History of Latin America and the United States

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course compares the histories of Latin America and the United States from pre-Columbian times to the 20th century. Students learn about the deep influence of the United States in Latin American economies, politics, and culture, especially after the United States' independence, when American democracy became a political model for the former Spanish American colonies. (G10: American History)
Prerequisite(s): EN 121 or EN 362.

LA 225 — Leisure in America

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course examines the emergence and changing role of leisure and its relation to work in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Situating leisure within its specific social, economic, and political contexts, students explore the complex intersection of factors and forces that have shaped conceptions and practices of leisure in American life through primary and secondary texts, both written and visual. (G10: American History)
Prerequisite(s): EN 121.

LA 242 — Hollywood: A History

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students learn the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present through the lens of the American film industry. The course focuses on the economic structure of the film industry and the evolving depictions of violence in movies as a factor in American History. (G10: American History).

LA 243 — Introduction to Television Studies

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

This course analyzes the medium of television in terms of its history, narrative, style, technique, editing, sound, and representation. Students view programs from the 1950s to the present, marking and investigating TV's transformations as it moves with and creates cultural history. Students acquire and use skills for reading television in terms of its production and signification. (G7: Humanities)
Prerequisite(s): EN 121.

LA 245 — Film Genres: Animation

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

In this history of animation course, students gain an understanding of animation as an art form and as a series of ideological texts to be read and interpreted within the context of the cultures that produced them.

LA 247 — The Other Hollywood: Film in New York

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course examines New York's significance in the history of American film. As the birthplace of the industry, the city has been a seedbed for innovation in documentary, avant-garde and independent film, as well as an icon in Hollywood cinema.

LA 251 — Contemporary Korean Cinema

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course is an introduction to South Korean cinema from the late 1980s to the present. Students study the concept of New Korean Cinema, the rise of the domestic film industry and auteurs, and the emergence of blockbusters and their growing regional and international recognition. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations).

LA 299 — Independent Study in Liberal Arts Divisional Studies

1-3 credit

Prerequisite(s): a minimum 3.5 GPA and approval of instructor, chairperson, and dean for Liberal Arts.

LA 321 — Survey of American Music

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

A study of the major styles, trends, and significant composers in American music. Through lecture and demonstration, students explore various types of music, including blues, current trends, folk, jazz, rock, show, and symphonic, focusing on their relation to the American experience. No musical background is necessary. (G6: Arts).

LA 342 — Film Genres: Crime Stories

3 credits; 2 lecture and 2 lab hours

This course examines interrelationships in film and literature, focusing on Crime Stories--novels and cinematic adaptations that tell stories of crimes from differing points of view, starting with the detective, moving toward the criminal, and ending with the victims. Students study a variety of crime genres: the whodunit, the film noir, the docudrama, the neo-noir and the metafiction. (G7: Humanities).

LA 397 — New York City and the Invention of America (Honors)

3 credits; 3 lecture hours

Students learn the history of America from the Civil War to the present, through the lens of its greatest metropolis. Readings stress the roles that New York has played as innovator, counterpoint, and despised exception in the culture, economics, politics, and technology of the U.S. Students develop skills in basic primary research, public speaking, reading comprehension, and writing and revising. (G10: American History)
Prerequisite(s): qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts.